Kirsty_Mitchell_Eclectix art

Kirsty Mitchell’s photography is an ethereal wonderland of lush fairy tales and historical fantastical dress set in beautiful woodlands – inspired by her memories of her mother reading aloud to her. She worked with Alexander McQueen’s studio and finished her costume studies at the London College of Fashion.

After her mother’s death, Kirsty immersed herself in photography to deal with the trauma of grief. Starting with everyday shots taken on the street or subway, her creations morphed into large detailed imaginative tableaus taken from her dreams. Involving much more than just clicking a shutter button, she hand made and painted everything - from the costumes to the sets. In the woodlands around her home, she constructed elaborate scenes akin to a miniature movie set, complete with lighting, assistants and models.

Eclectix - Admont Abbey Library

A Fairytale Come True – The Admont Abbey Library

Not Just Architecture, But Artitechture

The Admont Abbey Library in Austria, designed by the architect Joseph Hueber, is the oldest monastic library in the world. While the abbey itself was completed in 1074, the library (late Baroque) was not completed until 1776. At 70 metres long, it is also the largest in the world and features flamboyant ceiling frescoes, wooden sculptures and gold busts.

Hieronymus Bosch: Complete Works taschen

Book Nook

Hieronymus Bosch Complete Works by Stefan Fischer

Taschen has recently published a wonderful huge volume of the complete works of Hieronymus Bosch. One of our standard Eclectix questions we ask artists when we interview them is -“If you could own one piece of art, out of the world’s collections, what would it be?” And a vast majority of artists always reply - Hieronymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights. So we knew we had to share this sumptuous new release from Taschen with all his fans… feast your eyes on the father of surrealism!


Design: The Lumio Book Lamp

A lamp that looks like a book or a book that looks like a lamp – either way you say it, it’s a downright wonderful idea. The Lumio book lamp was created in San Francisco by industrial designer Max Gunawan who got the inspiration from his fascination with origami designs. He saw it’s functional potential wanted to create a flexible lighting solution that adapts to the user’s needs.