Art On The Web

It’s not often that I go to a Tumblr site and just can’t pull away. However, the well curated site - The Villa of Ormen - did just that, pulled me in for an extended darkly fantastic voyage. If you like otherworldly, surreal, mysterious imagery with haunted overtones, this is the bomb. Bits of words of wisdom, philosophical quotes and symbolism also sprinkle this site, in between the stunningly gorgeous images.

Eclectix - kofta fashion design

The Fierce Fashion of Konstantin Kofta

Eclectic clothing designer Konstantin Kofta creates extremely original, avant-garde and sumptuously designed backpacks, bags and shoes. The eclectic flavors of Bosch, Audrey Hepburn, Giger and Edward Scissorhands pop into mind.  He pulls his inspiration from human anatomy (spines, skin), elements of nature (tree roots, soil textures), Baroque architecture and his interpretations of the sacred and darker spirits.


Photography: Jessica Ledwich

Melbourne photographer Jessica Ledwich previously worked as a fashion photographer, but she found it constraining and now she concentrates on visual fine art. In Ledwich’s series - The Monstrous Feminine, she confronts the extremes women will go to in the pursuit of beauty. Inspired by a Julia Kristeva essay that looked at the role of women as portrayed in horror films, it got her thinking about the monstrous things women do to themselves. Her works are starkly dramatic and powerful, pulling no punches – she gets in our face with the absurd realities of “beauty” rituals.

Cabinets of Wonder book

Book Nook: The Cabinets of Wonder Book

Cabinets of Wonder  (also known as Cabinets of curiosities, Kunstkabinett, Kunstkammer, Wunderkammer and wonder-rooms) are encyclopedic collections of objects popular in Renaissance Europe. The objects usually included belong to natural history (sometimes faked), geology, ethnography, archaeology, religious or historical relics, works of art (including cabinet paintings), and antiquities.


Book Nook

Heavenly Bodies Cult Treasures and Spectacular Saints from the Catacombs

by Paul Koudounaris

In 1578 a labyrinth of underground burials was discovered in Rome that contained the remains of thousands of individuals assumed to be early Christian martyrs. The bones were disinterred and sent to many Catholic churches and religious houses in German-speaking Europe to replace holy relics that had been destroyed during the Protestant Reformation.